The real story behind the founding of the Illuminati

Unfortunately, the Illuminati has become a counterintelligence buzz meme deployed by the CIA’s Tin Foil Hat Patrol to confuse people and divert attention away from some real men standing behind the curtain. Our history books ignore the fact that history is largely the study of secret societies, and the CIA is just one of many, and the history of intelligence is long and bloody.

It all seems to have started with the Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon, otherwise known as the Templars, who began with nine members in 1129 and the official endorsement of the Catholic church. They grew enormously over the centuries and became the central bank of Europe with standing armies, merchant fleets and fortified castles. The Templars built most of the great cathedrals.

In 1198, another society appeared out of Germany, also recognized by the Pope of Rome, the Order of Brothers of the German House of Saint Mary in Jerusalem, otherwise known as the Teutonic Knights, and they went on to establish the kingdom of Prussia.

After the Templars became the most powerful global corporation, and began making plans to establish their own kingdom in southern France in imitation of the Teutonic Knights, the King of France became greatly alarmed. He devised a plot to move the Papacy to France and then conspired to outlaw the order and seize their assets in one fell swoop, while killing or imprisoning all members on Friday the 13th in 1307. This is why Friday the 13th has magical connotations.

The Templars and Teutonics created initiatory societies with secret rituals and degrees, all under the direction of a grandmaster of the order, typically a position held for life. These magical societies were influenced by the Pythagoreans who had once enjoyed immense popularity before the Catholic Church began persecuting paganism. Pythagoras studied with Zoroastrians, the greatest mathematicians and astronomers, and the Zoroastrians had been influenced by Scythians, and adopted their sacramental and inspirational use of cannabis.

All original knight myths as well as the story of the holy grail and the round table can be traced to the Scythians. King Arthur is an update on Heracles.

After the Templars were roasted alive at the stake, various secret societies flourished all over Europe, and the most powerful one became known as the Freemasons. The oldest-known lodge is in Scotland and traces the order to 1598, although it could have been established as early as 1425. There was much speculation at the time the Templars might have slipped into masonry in order to survive.

In 1534, seven Spanish noblemen with military backgrounds established the Society of Jesus, known as the Jesuits, and this order assumed fantastic power, eclipsing even the mighty Templars, at which point the Jesuits began attracting persecutions all over Europe, starting in Portugal. Paranoia against them became so great eventually the Pope outlawed the order in 1773, and they fled to sanctuary in Russia for a few years while still managing to hold onto many assets through fronting operations.

Two years later, the Equestrian, Secular and Chapterial Order of Saint Joachim was established in Bavaria by 14 German nobles. Some were Catholic, some Lutheran, some Freemasons, some Rosicrucians. Their possible goal was the unification of Germany, which was splintered into 500 separate kingdoms. These knights were dedicated to spreading religious tolerance. It doesn’t take much imagination to realize that tolerance might include letting the Jesuits back into Europe. Germany had been divided between Lutherans and Catholics for centuries, resulting in almost constant warfare, so religious tolerance was a popular concept.

The following year after the appearance of the Joachim knights, the Covenant of Perfectibility was created at a Jesuit-owned university in Bavaria by a professor of Catholic law named Adam Weishaupt, an orphan raised by Jesuits. The name of Weishaupt’s group was eventually changed to Order of the Illuminati. Several Knights of Joachim were founding members, which certainly guaranteed tremendous influence and potential resources.

Weishaupt was a master counterintelligence strategist, and his society was designed as a secret nest inside Freemasonry.

“The great strength of our Order lies in it’s concealment,” wrote Weishaupt, “let it never appear in any place in it’s own name, but always covered by another name, and another occupation. None is fitter than the three lower degrees of Freemasonry, the public is accustomed to it, expects little from it, and therefore takes little notice of it. Next to this, the form of a learned or literary society is best suited to our purpose. By establishing Reading Societies, and subscription libraries, and taking these under our direction, and supplying them through our labours, we may turn the public mind which way we will.”

Weishaupt suggested they secretly enlist the most attractive members of the opposite sex possible into the operation, not as full-fledged members but as secret operatives, what’s known today in spook world as “honey traps.”

Weishaupt sought virtuous and non-virtuous members, and kept those two groups unaware of the other. In fact, most members only knew their handler, and once a person joined, Weishaupt was given details on their background, desires and ambitions, and some were immediately elevated, guaranteeing their lifelong devotion to his order. The Templars, Teutonics, and Jesuits had pioneered the art of counterintelligence, and Weishaupt may have studied them all. But he had no background in ritual, and launched his society prematurely with a plethora of degrees before he had any rituals on paper. He reached out to an experienced mason to invent the rituals.

When some of Weishaupt’s methods were revealed to the public, there was a panic against secret societies in Bavaria and all were outlawed, although the ban was repeated several times, indicating it had a slippery hold on the situation and it’s possible the ban only served to make the group more notorious and more popular, just as it’s possible Weishaupt was a Jesuit front all along. Eventually, Weishaupt announced the dissolution of the order and retired to live near the estate of one of the Joachim Knights.

But after the French revolution, the leading Jesuit in France declared the Jacobins who fomented the revolution had been manipulated by the Illuminati, a charge repeated by a Christian historian in Scotland. In fact, various reading rooms around France had helped foment the revolution, just as Weishaupt had suggested they do.

In more modern times the Knights of Malta and Opus Dei have achieved immense influence, power and wealth inside the Catholic Church, whose mysterious banking operations are kept heavily cloaked.

Antony Sutton

In the 1980s, Antony Sutton would write America’s Secret Establishment, a book that revealed Yale University’s Order of Skull & Bones was likely a chapter of the Illuminati.

There are many secret societies, and many initiatory orders with religious connections and untangling this complex world is the key to opening the curtain on the men pushing the buttons on the Wizard of Oz. Unfortunately, almost everything written on this subject is fabricated as a diversion away from the truth.

TIMELINE:

1478 — The Spanish Inquisition attacks the last vestiges of Manichaeism that had survived in a quasi-Christian form.

1509 — Inspired by tales of Camelot, Íñigo López de Loyola (Ignatius of Loyola), takes up arms for the Duke of Najera in Spain at age 18; wounded in battle, he studies the lives of the Saints while hospitalized; inspired by Francis of Assisi he develops guided meditation techniques while on pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

1517 — The Reformation begins at the University of Wittenberg, Germany.

1525 — Inquisitor General Alonso Manrique de Lara issues an edict against alumbrados, who believe enlightenment brings a state of impeccability that allows indulgence in sinful acts without staining the soul.

1534 — After graduating from the University of Alcala in his early thirties (where he studied theology and Latin) Ignatius falls in with a group of alumbrados and is called before the Inquisitor General to be grilled on his beliefs.

1539 — Ignatius founds the Society of Jesus (The Jesuits) with six students at the University of Paris, all of whom have military experience; they quickly create schools and send missionaries around the world; and lead retreats that practice group silence, followed by guided group meditations. They become the Catholic Church’s vanguard against the Reformation, but begin to alarm Europe’s oligarchies with the speed with which they dominate trade and economic development, a lot of which stems from profits taken from the New World.

1614 — Three anonymous documents are circulated through Europe reporting on secret powers attained by mystics; they are all written as fake news, but become widely accepted as fact, launching the Protestant-connected Rosicrucian movement which is infested with fake mystics who deploy magic shows to lure high-ranking Freemasons and their wives into their staged seance psyops.

1773 — Bending to royal pressures, the Pope of Rome begins a campaign of suppression against the Jesuits to stem their growing influence.

1776 — The Illuminati is founded by Adam Weishaupt, a professor of canon law at a Jesuit university in Ingolstadt, Germany.

1777 — Weishaupt joins Freemasonry in order to secretly spread his society.

1784
1785
1787 — Illuminati banned four times, some internal correspondence published, bans have little impact other than driving Weishaupt into retirement
1790

1797 — History of Jacobinism by Augustin Barruel accuses Illuminati of fomenting the Reign of Terror as a massive psyop, a book written by the leading Jesuit of France; while Proofs of a Conspiracy by John Robison published in Scotland by a Protestant contains much of the same accusations.

1798 — An Illuminati scare spreads through New England, mostly through Protestant pulpits.

1818 — 20-year-old Mary Shelley writes Frankenstein, set in Ingolstadt; it is intended as an update on Prometheus and draws on the city’s reputation for Illuminist intrigues.

1826 — William Morgan murdered in Batavia, New York, after publishing an expose of Freemasonry.

1830 — Weishaupt dies but not before being reconciled with the Catholic Church, indicating his split with them may have been staged.

1832 — Order of Skull & Bones founded at Yale University after William Huntington Russell visits Germany and joins a college fraternity there during summer school. Skull & Bones rituals will mirror those of the original Illuminati.

1836 — Russell creates a military prep school in New Haven to prepare young men to serve as officers for a coming Civil War.

1837 — Funded by Russell, John Brown devotes himself to the destruction of slavery through violence, and sparks the war Russell was agitating for.

1880 — Prussian police spy Theodor Reuss revives the Illuminati in Munich, but the name of the order is soon changed to Ordo Templi Orientis (OTO).

After the Illuminati were exposed in the late 1770s, and found in possession of all sorts of devious spy tech, the real secrets of the order were shipped to the King of Sweden to protect them. These documents were eventually returned to a Masonic lodge in Bavaria, and were eventually seized by the Nazis, who briefly imprisoned the head of the OTO, and banned all masonic lodges, unless they pledged loyalty to Hitler.

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