Was Uri Geller always a spook?

Puharich and Geller.

Geller arrived on the scene courtesy of Andrija Puharich, a U.S. Army officer from Edgewood Arsenal Research Laboratories and Camp Detrick, where he frequently consorted in secret with high-ranking officers from Pentagon, CIA and Naval Intelligence (perhaps the spookiest of all the spook agencies). Detrick was the heart of MK/Ultra, the CIA’s most closely guarded secret. Puharich organized seances for the oligarchy that really rules North America and he became Geller’s biggest champion.

The spoon bending trick was an obvious scam from day one. If he really had telekinesis, why not reveal multiple proofs, and not stick with metal spoons, something easily rigged with some deft slight-of-hand. Hard to fathom how he achieved such fame with such a lame trick, but perhaps the Mighty Wurlitzer assisted his rise as that sort of scam is standard procedure for spook ops, and certainly Blavatsky and Crowley come to mind in regard to phony claims of psychic powers made by obvious spooks.

A filmmaker from England just released a documentary on Geller claiming this magician—who claims telepathic powers were taught to him by aliens—was really doing a lot of work for national security as a psychic out-of-body voyager. My instant thought: is MI6 behind this in order to bilk profits from an old operation? That’s how cynical I am. Otherwise, why would the biggest newspapers in England be promoting this conspiracy film?

One wonders how much money Geller was paid by various intelligence agencies over the years and I can’t wait for the Hollywood movie, since this feels like an orchestrated follow-up to the movie about staring at goats that was so successful, the first peek onto psychic weirdness at the highest level of the Pentagon.

“We use footage from the CIA-funded film record of the Uri Geller experiments, and we then track stories about Uri’s involvement in events ranging from the Israeli commando raid on Entebbe through to his participation in the search for Osama bin Laden, with a mysterious sidebar as a federal agent for the Mexican government. Forty years of psychic operations,” writes Vikram Jayanti, in today’s Guardian, who goes on to assert: “In the film, someone well positioned to know suggests that rather than being shut down in 1995, the use of psychic operatives by the US government and military has merely gone deeper black. If that’s the case, then perhaps Geller is still at work in the shadows.”

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