Was Uri Geller always a spook?

Puharich and Geller.

Geller arrived on the scene courtesy of Andrija Puharich, a U.S. Army officer from Edgewood Arsenal Research Laboratories and Camp Detrick, where he frequently consorted in secret with high-ranking officers from Pentagon, CIA and Naval Intelligence (perhaps the spookiest of all the spook agencies). Detrick was the heart of MK/Ultra, the CIA’s most closely guarded secret. Puharich organized seances for the oligarchy that really rules North America and he became Geller’s biggest champion.

The spoon bending trick was an obvious scam from day one. If he really had telekinesis, why not reveal multiple proofs, and not stick with metal spoons, something easily rigged with some deft slight-of-hand. Hard to fathom how he achieved such fame with such a lame trick, but perhaps the Mighty Wurlitzer assisted his rise as that sort of scam is standard procedure for spook ops, and certainly Blavatsky and Crowley come to mind in regard to phony claims of psychic powers made by obvious spooks.

A filmmaker from England just released a documentary on Geller claiming this magician—who claims telepathic powers were taught to him by aliens—was really doing a lot of work for national security as a psychic out-of-body voyager. My instant thought: is MI6 behind this in order to bilk profits from an old operation? That’s how cynical I am. Otherwise, why would the biggest newspapers in England be promoting this conspiracy film?

One wonders how much money Geller was paid by various intelligence agencies over the years and I can’t wait for the Hollywood movie, since this feels like an orchestrated follow-up to the movie about staring at goats that was so successful, the first peek onto psychic weirdness at the highest level of the Pentagon.

“We use footage from the CIA-funded film record of the Uri Geller experiments, and we then track stories about Uri’s involvement in events ranging from the Israeli commando raid on Entebbe through to his participation in the search for Osama bin Laden, with a mysterious sidebar as a federal agent for the Mexican government. Forty years of psychic operations,” writes Vikram Jayanti, in today’s Guardian, who goes on to assert: “In the film, someone well positioned to know suggests that rather than being shut down in 1995, the use of psychic operatives by the US government and military has merely gone deeper black. If that’s the case, then perhaps Geller is still at work in the shadows.”

The Fraudulent Founding of Modern Magick

Nicolas Flamel was a scribe, notary and bookseller in the late 1300s in Paris who grew immensely wealthy, eventually founding fourteen hospitals while donating handsomely to many chapels and churches. In the 1700s, several hundred years after his death, The Book of Hieroglyphic Figures appeared and purported to have been written by him. Its introduction described how for two guilders, the author purchased the Book of Abramelin the Mage, an unusual manuscript on tree bark written in a strange language by Abraham the Jew, an Egyptian magician. According to the book, the author decoded Abramelin’s formulas of magic and alchemy, learning the secrets of the philosopher’s stone, which accounted for his great wealth and success in life.

The Book of Hieroglyphic Figures immediately became the go-to manual for magic all over Europe and exerted tremendous influence over the development of Freemasonry, the Golden Dawn and OTO. Only one problem, however: it was an obvious hoodwink. Flamel lived into his eighties and designed his own tombstone (see below), which contained only images of Jesus, Peter and Paul. He was a devout Catholic with an extensive biography that never mentions alchemy or occult ritual even once. If Flamel had a secret source of income beyond his bookstores and notary offices, it has yet to be discovered, but it’s safe to say any claims he was turning lead into gold is a total fabrication. His great wealth and connections with ancient manuscripts made him the perfect foil on which to hang a magical hoodwink. No doubt Flamel rolled in his grave after being posthumously transformed into the world’s greatest magician, instead of the great benefactor of Catholicism he actually was.

Forget about the phony DaVinci Code and numerous other rabbit holes. If you want to decode the real story of religion and magic, you first must expose the hoodwinks and then follow the trail to their source to expose the charlatan. (It’s interesting Flamel was turned into the world’s greatest alchemist when Francois Rabelais remains a better candidate for that throne, and actually did the necessary work.)

In 1761, Etienne Villain claimed the book’s real author was P. Arnauld de la Chevalerie, the publisher who was profiting immensely off its sales. Unfortunately, Villain’s expose gained little traction and even Issac Newton was eventually taken in by the hoodwink. You find this pattern of fake secret knowledge appearing throughout the history of magic, all leading into rabbit holes instead of real enlightenment. A modern equivalent would be the Don Juan series of books that continue to hoodwink even today.

Eventually, the Book of Abramelin the Mage also appeared written in German, although in somewhat fragmentary form. According to this manuscript, the road to enlightenment required months of daily prayer at sunrise and sunset, chastity, fasting and avoidance of intoxicants (echoes of Pythagoras and Mani). With the help of your guardian angel, who will appear after months of prayer, the budding magician need only capture and bind 12 devils in order to usurp their powers. Once this is done, the ability to cast love charms, find buried treasure, fly and become invisible will be conferred.

The magical tools employed by Abramelin included a wand made from an almond tree, and an oil and incense derived from the Old Testament. There was also a lamp for burning the oil. Although the oil was identified only as Abramelin Oil, it was supposed to replicate the original anointing oil of Moses. It would become an essential tool in the rituals of the Golden Dawn and OTO, although they didn’t agree on the recipe. They both got it wrong, replacing kaneh bosem with calamus or galangal (a relative of ginger).

Here is the actual recipe from Exodus 30:22-25:

Take thou…pure myrrh five hundred shekels, and of sweet cinnamon half so much, even two hundred and fifty shekels, and of kaneh bosem, two hundred and fifty shekels, and of cassia five hundred shekels, and of oil olive an hin: And thou shalt make it an oil of holy ointment, an ointment compounded after the art of the apothecary: it shall be an holy anointing oil.

The translation of kaneh bosem (fragrant cane) was not correctly identified until Sula Benet published Early Diffusion and Folk Uses of Hemp in 1967. Meanwhile, for hundreds of years, churches and magical societies have all been dutifully burning incense and anointing themselves with oil containing zero psychoactive effect. Although Crowley loved psychoactive substances, he too was taken in, for here is his personal recipe:

8 parts cinnamon oil, 4 parts myrrh, 2 parts galangal, 7 parts olive oil

All manner of nonsense was written about the purpose, effect and great power of Abramelin Oil. Fumigating temples with cannabis incenses and serving cannabis beverages were employed by numerous temples in ancient times to enhance the spiritual experience, much the same way a psychedelic garage band might hand out mushrooms before a concert today. But if you remove all psychoactive substances, there is no enhancement, and no magic, just a weak form of fake magic.

Suppression of the true story of the role of cannabis on the development of religion and myth has been so intense for so long that despite all the newly uncovered scientific evidence, most people still have no idea that cannabis was used as the primary medicine by Zoroaster, Moses and Jesus, among others and had a reputation for healing the blind and lame centuries before the arrival of the Jesus myth. Jesus was a Zoroastrian-Buddha hybrid, which is why the Magi attend his birth and why he preached against worshipping statue representations of Jehovah.

Perhaps the most important element of intel control over magic and religion has been diverting people away from cannabis and toward a poison mushroom, Amanita Muscaria. This op was launched by Robert Gordon Wasson, Vice-President and director of public relations for J.P. Morgan & Co., who had begun career by asserting his company had not been built on the back of selling defective weapons to the Union during the Civil War, an effort that largely failed to gain traction. Wasson next concocted an absurd story of wandering upon some magic mushrooms in the Catskills in 1927 and soon was peddling a phony secret history of mushrooms, which culminated with his falsely identifying Soma and Haoma as Amanita. Unfortunately, this hoodwink got massive traction. Since the scholarship was so sloppy and obviously directed by an agenda, one wonders why virtually nothing has been done to topple his absurd ideas and correct the historical record.  Soma is a form of bhang, in other words, cannabis and milk with spices. And the history of cannabis in ancient Judea has been scientifically proven, so why isn’t it widely known the burning bush in the Bible is a reference to cannabis intoxication? At least from the 1950s on, Wasson’s work in this area was funded by the CIA’s MK/Ultra program, and he was greatly assisted by having his efforts put on the cover of Life magazine.

In the 1970s, Wasson passed the Amanita baton to Andrija Puharich, an Army MD also working for MK/Ultra out of Fort Detrick. Puharich would launch the career of British-Israeli self-claimed psychic Uri Geller while also arranging seances for elite members of the oligarchy, a list that included various Duponts and Bronfmans, among others.

“We use footage from the CIA-funded film record of the Uri Geller experiments, and we then track stories about Uri’s involvement in events ranging from the Israeli commando raid on Entebbe through to his participation in the search for Osama bin Laden, with a mysterious sidebar as a federal agent for the Mexican government. Forty years of psychic operations,” writes Vikram Jayanti, a filmmaker who produced a puff piece for the BBC. Jayanti goes on to assert: “Someone well positioned to know suggests that rather than being shut down in 1995, the use of psychic operatives by the US government and military has merely gone deeper black. If that’s the case, then perhaps Geller is still at work in the shadows.”

Maybe, but no matter what Geller is up to, it’s really some staged hoodwink involving deception to create an illusion of magic power. Knowingly or unknowingly, religions work with the national security state to maintain a status quo magic show, and so do all the occult alternatives. Most of your so-called psychics who reach icon status are intelligence agents. Magic and religion are the same thing, and only work on believers, but then there are a lot of those people around.

Ira Einhorn and the Origins of Earth Day

Maybe you’ve read some of the disinfo stories about how the counterculture was supposedly a government plot to divide and destroy the country? How government agents secretly encouraged rampant drug use in the 1960s to poison the minds of a new generation, allowing them to be brought under the influence of “new age” ideas?

I don’t believe most of these stories, especially the ones that paint Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters as being involved in such activities. Yes, Kesey did get his first taste of acid through a CIA-program, like a lot of people at the time, but anyone who studies his life immediately realizes Kesey was not on anyone’s leash. The same can be said for Abbie Hoffman, Stephen Gaskin and many other important leaders of the counterculture movement. Which is not to say intel wasn’t trying to exploit the counterculture, turn it violent and lead it off a cliff. Obviously, any social movement of any size will be quickly penetrated by intel. That’s what they do. And there are a number of suspicious characters, like Ron Stark, who obviously had secret agendas. Another such character is Ira Einhorn, who sometimes gets credited as one of the founders of the environmental movement.

Einhorn’s early claim to fame was his role as “master of ceremonies” at the first Earth Day celebration, but you won’t find that mentioned on the wikipedia page covering that event today, probably because he recently died on April 3, 2020 while serving a life sentence for murdering his ex-girlfriend, Holly Maddux, who was found stuffed in a trunk on his porch in 1979. Although portrayed as a “hippie guru,” Einhorn’s associations and connections seem much more related to CIA activities than anything to do with the hippie counterculture.

He was mentored in paranormal research by Andrija Puharich, a former army officer who has interesting connections not only to the intelligence agencies but also to the oligarchy that really rules North America. Puharich is best known today for bringing Uri Geller to fame, but he was also involved with MK/Ultra research at Fort Dietrick, as well as organizing black magic seances in upstate New York with members of the Bronfman and DuPont families, among others. You can find background material on Puharich in both Peter Levenda’s Sinister Forces (now out-of-print and very expensive), and Hank Albarelli’s A Terrible Mistake (both published by Trine Day).

There’s probably enough in those two books to convince you that anyone mentored by Puharich should be looked at with suspicion.

After Einhorn’s arrest, Arlen Specter, the Warren Commission lawyer who invented the “single bullet” theory, came to his rescue along with Barbara Bronfman, heiress to the Seagram fortune. At the time, Einhorn claimed he was being framed by the CIA because of his left-wing political activities.

Specter managed to get him a very low bail, which Bronfman posted, and Einhorn fled the country, probably with funds provided by Bronfman. In 1997, long after he was convicted in absentia, Einhorn was located living in France under a new name with a Swedish girlfriend. After a long and protracted extradition struggle, Einhorn was finally brought back to Pennsylvania on July 20, 2001, and put in jail to serve his life sentence.

The lesson to be taken from all of this is the potential realization that all popular mass movements eventually become penetrated by intelligence operations. The environmental movement of today, spearheaded by Al Gore, is undoubtedly also a carefully-constructed operation. The rightwing has their apocalypse, centered on the Middle East and ideas about “rapture,” while the leftwing has their apocalypse, centered on the imminent collapse of our environment. Apocalyptic thinking is crucial to maintaining mass mind control because fear is the foundation. The most apocalyptic of all the sixties cults was the Process Church of Final Judgment.