Was Uri Geller always a spook?

Puharich and Geller.

Geller arrived on the scene courtesy of Andrija Puharich, a U.S. Army officer from Edgewood Arsenal Research Laboratories and Camp Detrick, where he frequently consorted in secret with high-ranking officers from Pentagon, CIA and Naval Intelligence (perhaps the spookiest of all the spook agencies). Detrick was the heart of MK/Ultra, the CIA’s most closely guarded secret. Puharich organized seances for the oligarchy that really rules North America and he became Geller’s biggest champion.

The spoon bending trick was an obvious scam from day one. If he really had telekinesis, why not reveal multiple proofs, and not stick with metal spoons, something easily rigged with some deft slight-of-hand. Hard to fathom how he achieved such fame with such a lame trick, but perhaps the Mighty Wurlitzer assisted his rise as that sort of scam is standard procedure for spook ops, and certainly Blavatsky and Crowley come to mind in regard to phony claims of psychic powers made by obvious spooks.

A filmmaker from England just released a documentary on Geller claiming this magician—who claims telepathic powers were taught to him by aliens—was really doing a lot of work for national security as a psychic out-of-body voyager. My instant thought: is MI6 behind this in order to bilk profits from an old operation? That’s how cynical I am. Otherwise, why would the biggest newspapers in England be promoting this conspiracy film?

One wonders how much money Geller was paid by various intelligence agencies over the years and I can’t wait for the Hollywood movie, since this feels like an orchestrated follow-up to the movie about staring at goats that was so successful, the first peek onto psychic weirdness at the highest level of the Pentagon.

“We use footage from the CIA-funded film record of the Uri Geller experiments, and we then track stories about Uri’s involvement in events ranging from the Israeli commando raid on Entebbe through to his participation in the search for Osama bin Laden, with a mysterious sidebar as a federal agent for the Mexican government. Forty years of psychic operations,” writes Vikram Jayanti, in today’s Guardian, who goes on to assert: “In the film, someone well positioned to know suggests that rather than being shut down in 1995, the use of psychic operatives by the US government and military has merely gone deeper black. If that’s the case, then perhaps Geller is still at work in the shadows.”

Ira Einhorn and the Origins of Earth Day

Maybe you’ve read some of the disinfo stories about how the counterculture was supposedly a government plot to divide and destroy the country? How government agents secretly encouraged rampant drug use in the 1960s to poison the minds of a new generation, allowing them to be brought under the influence of “new age” ideas? I don’t believe many of these stories, especially the ones that try to paint Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters as being involved in such activities. Yes, Kesey did get his first taste of acid through a CIA-program, like a lot of people did at the time, but anyone who studies his life immediately realizes Kesey was not on anyone’s leash. The same can be said for Abbie Hoffman, Stephen Gaskin, Wavy Gravy, Paul Krassner, Tom Forcade and many other important leaders of the counterculture movement. Which is not to say intel wasn’t trying to exploit the counterculture, turn it violent and lead it off a cliff. Obviously, any social movement of any size will be quickly penetrated by intel. That’s what they do. And there are a number of suspicious characters, like Ron Stark, who obviously had secret agendas. Another such character is Ira Einhorn, who sometimes gets credited as one of the founders of the environmental movement.

Einhorn’s early claim to fame was his role as “master of ceremonies” at the first Earth Day celebration, but you won’t find that mentioned on the wikipedia page covering that event today, probably because he’s currently in prison serving a life sentence for murdering his ex-girlfriend, Holly Maddux, who was found stuffed in a trunk on his porch in 1979. Although portrayed as a “hippie guru,” Einhorn’s associations and connections seem much more related to CIA activities than anything to do with the hippie counterculture.

He was mentored in paranormal research by Andrija Puharich, a former army officer who has interesting connections not only to the intelligence agencies but also to the oligarchy that really rules North America. Puharich is best known today for bringing Uri Geller to fame, but he was also involved with MK/Ultra research at Fort Dietrick, as well as organizing black magic seances in upstate New York with members of the Bronfman and DuPont families, among others. You can find background material on Puharich in both Peter Levenda’s Sinister Forces (now out-of-print and very expensive), and Hank Albarelli’s A Terrible Mistake (both published by Trine Day).

There’s probably enough in those two books to convince you that anyone mentored by Puharich should be looked at with suspicion.

After Einhorn’s arrest, Arlen Specter, the Warren Commission lawyer who invented the “single bullet” theory, came to his rescue along with Barbara Bronfman, heiress to the Seagram fortune. At the time, Einhorn claimed he was being framed by the CIA because of his left-wing political activities.

Specter managed to get him a very low bail, which Bronfman posted, and Einhorn fled the country, probably with funds provided by Bronfman. In 1997, long after he was convicted in absentia, Einhorn was located living in France under a new name with a Swedish girlfriend. After a long and protracted extradition struggle, Einhorn was finally brought back to Pennsylvania on July 20, 2001, and put in jail to serve his life sentence.

The lesson to be taken from all of this is the potential realization that all popular mass movements eventually become penetrated by intelligence operations. The environmental movement of today, spearheaded by Al Gore, is undoubtedly also a carefully-constructed operation. The rightwing has their apocalypse, centered on the Middle East and ideas about “rapture,” while the leftwing has their apocalypse, centered on the imminent collapse of our environment. Apocalyptic thinking is crucial to maintaining mass mind control because fear is the foundation. The most apocalyptic of all the sixties cults was the Process Church of Final Judgment, who managed to capture and influence Charlie Manson when he appeared in the Haight straight out of a long stretch in prison.