Guide to the Disinfo Matrix

I was on facebook the other day when one of my unknown friends posted a link to a book titled Big Oil by Dean Henderson. It didn’t have a single review on Amazon so I thought it was something new. In the promo material, some person from South America said it deserved the Pulitzer Prize. It was super expensive at $25, but often the most reliable books on deep politics cost money, so I thought I was ordering a real book and bought it without really looking into the author at all.

Unfortunately, when the book arrived yesterday, I quickly discovered it was filled with misinformation and quoted people like David Icke and William Cooper as if they were serious journalists, which they are not. I opened it at random and came to a quote saying Allen Dulles was a member of Skull & Bones, a secret society at Yale, when, in fact, Dulles had gone to Princeton. Soon, I realized Dean Henderson is either a knowing agent of disinfo or a brainwashed stooge of the disinfo matrix (more on that later).

Paul Krassner, the dean of underground journalism, began printing conspiracy research in the 1960s in his national magazine, The Realist, forging a trail few in journalism would ever follow. Pretty soon, researchers were crawling out of the woodwork and sending Paul stories. Even today, when he no longer publishes conspiracy research, these characters are still peppering him with their nutty theories. I know because Paul forwards the wackiest stuff to me, as if to say, “see how crazy your compatriots are?” Many of these people are undoubtedly plants. Of course, the most famous of these characters was Mae Brussell, whose research seemed authentic at first, but pretty soon Paul realized Mae was leading him down a rabbit hole and connecting dots that didn’t really connect, leading him on a wild goose chase to nowhere. That’s when Paul stopped trusting conspiracy researchers [Paul adds: I felt it necessary not to have predisposed perception, to distinguish coincidence from conspiracy, and not let what might be perceived as evidence be tainted by ego or agenda]. After most people get burned after falling in a rabbit hole, it becomes really difficult to get past the noise to the real info that noise is designed to conceal. The game is to sheep-deep all deep political research as crackpot nonsense by flooding the field with crack-pot nonsense. Unfortunately, this game has worked very well for over 50 years now.

I’m too old and too wise to fall for this crapola, although I can’t say the same for a lot of people I meet, who seem to gobble up the latest pronouncements by Icke, Rense, Jones and the rest of the captains of disinfo. Henderson’s book wasn’t just sourced through these dubious characters, though. He also quoted a number of more reliable conspiracy researchers, some of whom have suspicious axes to grind. In this list, I’d include anyone from the Lyndon LaRouche organization, Alex Constantine, and Mike Ruppert. These are probably disinfo agents, but at least they’re journalists who deal with verifiable facts and not baseless rumor and innuendo. The rabbit holes they lead you into (like Ruppert’s “Peak Oil” scam), are more credible than the shapeshifting aliens in Icke’s manifestos, although ultimately, I don’t think these sources can be trusted any more than their obviously crackpot counterparts.

After I got Henderson’s book, I learned he’s a regular on the Icke/Rense/Jones disinfo circuit. He also seems to be an activist in the Green movement. The environmental movement is heavily seeded with agents because the oil companies have to keep in eye on environmentalists to make sure they don’t do anything damaging to their bottom line, which is why they’ve installed an oligarchy insider like Al Gore as their chief lightening rod. It’s a dialectical game, just like almost everything else that goes on inside deep politics.

Once you get past those two levels of disinfo, you get to real journalists with no visible axes to grind, a list that includes Antony Sutton, Gary Webb, Steve Kangas, Daniel Hopsicker, Dick Russell, Alfred McCoy, Danny Casolaro, and Peter Dale Scott. These are the authors you have to read and if I find their names and books in a bibliography, then I know I’m dealing with a serious researcher. The more serious a researcher is, however, the more ignored they will become over time. Deep political research is a great way to “break your rice bowl,” which is how they put it to Antony Sutton when he veered off the designated rails. You can put me in this category too, as I once had a flourishing journalism career, but after I began publishing deep political research in High Times, I soon realized I no longer had a journalism career. My book, The Octopus Conspiracy, got exactly one review when it came out—in a local publication in Woodstock, New York.

Shortly after 9/11, Retired General Mirza Aslam Beg, former chief of staff of the Pakistani Army, said 9/11 was an operation of the American intelligence agencies. Beg also claimed Wikileaks is a tool of psy-war, and not a real whistle-blowing operation, and that Osama bin Laden died in 2009, and that the Seal Team killed a lookalike stand-in. Of course, researchers like me know Beg is probably telling the truth.

Oh, and by the way, I left my review of Big Oil on Amazon. It wasn’t very favorable.

My Thoughts on Black Magic

In the year 2000, just before my wife was about to give birth to our first child, she became obsessed with the numbers 11:11. We ended up buying a house in Woodstock, and the fact the street address was 11 was very important to her.

Twice a day, my wife would remind me whenever the clock hit 11:11. She told me there was something very important about 11:11, although I thought she was just joking around. Since I played a major role in spreading 420 around the globe, I assumed my wife wanted to get in on some numerology of her own. But then, I always thought my wife was psychic, although it was nearly impossible for her to channel those energies, she just had to accept whatever insights came down the pike.

Imagine my surprise, when on September 11, 2001, American Airlines flight 11 hit the World Trade Center, which just happens to look like a giant 11. So it was really a case of 11.11.11.

Can this really be an accident? Probably. The most important factors in picking flights involved surveillance cameras and other security measures, not flight numbers. But we will likely never know whether or not the perpetrators deployed this numerology as a psychic bridge between the appearance of the towers and the terrible trauma.

But this is the way the mind works, especially when under stress. And that’s why dark magic can be so effective.

Most authors in conspiracy research, knowingly or unknowingly, are victims of disinfo on some levels. Early on, I published articles by Mike Ruppert and Alex Constantine, but after working with both for a few years, I came to the sad conclusion they were both disinfo artists. It just shows what a minefield conspiracy research really is, and how easy it can be to lead people down a garden path if you have more facts than the average person at your disposal.

The Most Dangerous Book in the World, a book written by a member of the neo-conservative movement, S.K. Bain, asserts that 9/11 was orchestrated around the elements of Aleister Crowley’s theories on magic. This is the same path being trod currently by Mark Passio. If you don’t understand how intel manufactures the Tin Foil Hat Patrol, you only have to read the dozens of rave reviews posted on Amazon concerning an obviously absurd book with near zero basis in reality.

There’s no doubt Crowley was interesting: a great mountain climber,  respected poet, from a distinguished family, and he experimented with drugs long before most people knew what they were. Crowley was obsessed with uncovering the science behind magic, but much of his work seems dated these days. And he was also a willing agent of British  intelligence. His foray into a German secret society (OTO), which began as a revival of the Illuminati, and which Crowley later took over, reminds me greatly of a German military intelligence officer’s foray into a rightwing occult-based party, which he took over. I am speaking of Adolf Hitler. In this regard, these two could be viewed as grandmaster black magicians of their time, locked in combat on the astral plane. Somehow, I suspect Rudolf Hess’s flight to Scotland involved their magical confrontations. The important thing to know about both people is they worked for military intelligence.

Crowley’s primary legacy today could be Scientology, a mind control op constructed after the founder, L. Ron Hubbard, got involved with Crowley’s OTO lodge in California led by rocket scientist Jack Parsons.

But then all religions are someone’s mind control op. Did you know the Mormon faith may have been invented to sweep up Freemasons who were abandoning that culture after fear swept through their temples that the British were secretly manipulating masonry? The Mormon rituals are just updates on the Mason rituals. So who’s magic is more powerful, the Freemasons, the Mormons, Crowley or the Nazis?

When the Franklin Savings and Loan scandal erupted and threatened to spread a cancer into the highest levels of government, former FBI agent Ted Gunderson was brought in for damage control. Gunderson soon began spreading the story that millions of Satanists were part of a secret network of evil and they were routinely brainwashing and abusing our children.

The sad reality is this satanist story was likely invented and spread as a rabbit hole. Sure there are plenty of evil Satanists in the world, although to be a Satanist you first have to believe in Christianity or something like it. Despite decades of investigation, however, not a single Satanist crime cell has ever been uncovered. More often, innocent victims have been branded as Satanists because they dress in black or listen to Metallica or like group sex. At least, that’s what happened in West Memphis. If you want to see some magic in action, check out children’s TV programming. You’ll find loads of dark magic almost everywhere you look.

When it comes to conspiracy research, however, I’ve always trusted my instincts. And my instincts tell me the attempt to run the 9/11 story into an Aleister Crowley ritual event will never result in any useful information about anything.

Yes, 9/11 was a magic ritual designed to sweep America into war and cover the electronic transfer of billions of dollars at the same time.

That’s the real story.

But if you start looking for acolytes of Aleister Crowley as being the brains or motivation behind the event, I’m afraid that search may not be any more fruitful than Gunderson’s widespread satanic investigations, none of which resulted in a single arrest or even uncovered a single cell of criminals.

You see, blaming an intelligence agent like Aleister Crowley for most of the evil in the world simply doesn’t pass the muster of my instincts.