Who was Shakespeare, really?

There’s a lot of interest in unveiling the real Shakespeare these days. That man from Avon was the business manager for one of the most famous acting companies of the day and had a well-documented life as a minor businessman, but no evidence he was actually a writer. The longest signed document was his will, in which he carefully catalogued all his possessions, which strangely, did not include a single book nor important manuscript. As a writer, I can assure you we keep copies of our creations.

When the man from Avon died, the world was silent. It wasn’t until seven years later that Ben Jonson wrote the intro to the first folio. But what if Jonson was really in on the gag and protecting the real story?
The man from Avon had two daughters, one of whom bizarrely appears to have been functionally illiterate. More important, however, for a commoner with no documented travel nor education, it is inconceivable the man from Avon could have absorbed all the details or had access to the wealth of information on a wide variety of subjects, or had such insight into the ways of the royals. Most likely it was a team, and included a woman because the female characters are so well crafted. Women were not allowed involvement with the theater at the time, which might help explain a need to remain anonymous. Likely, at least one man was involved, and perhaps more.

Edward de Vere was patron of the greatest acting troupe of the day, known as Oxford’s Men (de Vere was the Earl of Oxford), while the other group, The King’s Men, included Shakespeare as actor and business manager. The patron of the King’s Men was Henry Carey, who had a mistress 20 years younger than himself, Emilia Bassano, the most famous female poet of the age. Another female candidate is Mary Sidney, whose groundbreaking play Antonius revived interest in classical soliloquy. Sidney founded the most influential literary salon in the history of English literature and the most creative minds communed at her salon at Wilton House.

After having solved many mysteries, like the origins of the Holy Grail (born on the Hemp Road linking Europe with the East), Jay Gould’s involvement in the Lincoln assassination, JM/Wave’s involvement in the JFK assassination, my spotlight has turned onto the Shakespeare controversy.

Obviously the man from Avon does not have the CV for producing the work, and I believe only a team could cover the vast territory involved. My current thesis is a council overseen by Queen Elizabeth produced Shakespeare, and this group included another women or two, and at least one talented man, such as Francis Bacon.

The man from Avon died in 1616 and the first folio creating his legacy was not published until seven years later, when the mythology was first laid down by Ben Jonson, who strangely had said nothing seven years earlier when his supposed great friend passed away. Strange also how the man from Avon knew no other famous writers, and never appeared at any of the literary salons of the era. No one else famous seems to have known him. And strange how new work continued to be published after his death.

The first portrait of Shakespeare appeared in that folio and his facial features strongly resemble a mask, and, in fact, a distinct mask outline is included.

The Authorship issue,” says Lorenzo Geraldo, “is based on greed and continued misunderstanding ever since David Garrick came to Stratford in 1769 and started the illusion of William Shaksper as author of the Plays. Stratford is a tax haven for the Crown from the Tourist industry. Oxfordians continue to sell their water down by the river to naive newcomers. Edward de Vere is easily eliminated as he died way too early in 1604 before many of the plays were written. There are references in the plays that took place after 1604. Bacon on the other hand lived till 1626 and was there for the production of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio. Bacon left actual evidence behind with the only Shakespeare related diary or notebook, The Promus, that contains over 3 thousand unique Shakespeare phrases jotted down in his own handwriting that precedes the Plays publication and stage performances. This gag book would be a greater mystery if Bacon wasn’t Shakespeare. Yes there was collaboration, Ben Jonson is the key as he worked and lived with Francis Bacon after his impeachment. Jonson called Bacon, “The Chief” and wrote admiringly of Bacon’s mind and talents as did many other friends of Bacon’s who referred to himself as “a concealed poet.””

Watch the film below.
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aZ_cuc8OS4s

The James Bond Mythology

Ever wonder why a British assassin is the most revered cultural icon of our time? You have to wonder who came up with the idea of Queen Elizabeth opening the Olympics with Bond. At first, I could not believe that was the real Queen; it had to be a look-alike actress, but soon I realized, yes, the Queen wants to put some of the James Bond assassin juice into her own aura.

I don’t think James Bond could have gotten so big if not for JFK. Soon after he was elected, the young Kennedy revealed his love of Ian Fleming’s books to the press and pretty soon, those books were being serialized in almost every newspaper in America. Kennedy did some spy work himself. In fact, he was romantically involved with a possible Nazi spy while in England. JFK started the war in Naval Intelligence, the same outfit that made the secret deals with Lucky Luciano to watch the docks, and prepare Sicily for invasion, in exchange for some wink-wink arrangements with the French heroin trade, but he got moved out to the Pacific possibly in order to get sheep-dipped as a war hero, or so many believe. While JFK was saving a man’s life, however, George Bush was jumping out of his bomber first instead of last like a pilot’s supposed to, so he probably botched his war hero sheep-dipping by being responsible for a couple of unnecessary deaths, or so the legend goes.

Soon after taking office, Kennedy told the CIA that he wanted to meet “the American James Bond.” In other words, who’s the top assassin who handles the high priority wet work around here? No doubt Kennedy wanted to talk shop and spy craft.

But when the CIA brought him their number one assassin, William Harvey, Kennedy was unimpressed. Harvey was a thug and had none of the social grace of a James Bond.

But there was a man of intense charisma and social grace, who became Harvey’s go-to assassin. Harvey would soon approach this man about killing Castro—more on that later.

Meanwhile, after taking LSD with one of his many mistresses (Mary Meyer, who was handing it out to lots of people in Washington at the time), JFK began opening up secret, backdoor lines of communication to Cuba and the Soviet Union. He successfully negotiated the first nuclear arms treaty and probably wanted to restore relations with Cuba and avoid a land war in Asia.

Yes, acid turned Kennedy into a pacifist but that should be no surprise since it also propelled Steve Jobs into creating the personal computer. Unfortunately, Kennedy’s pacifism and peace incentives put him into conflict with the most powerful force in the world, the war party that employs war as a strategic means of extracting the greatest possible profits from the misery and suffering of innocent people.

After JFK ordered all operations against Cuba ended, he discovered Harvey was still fomenting terror in Cuba and plotting a Castro assassination. JFK ordered Harvey sacked, but instead, James J. Angleton moved him to Italy. He was once the CIA’s greatest assassin, after all, even though his health is now failing due to stress and heavy drinking, but his services might be needed very soon, or so Angleton surmised.

But who was the real-life American James Bond? The one with the wit, charm and grace of a British lord mixed with the skills of a ninja warrior?

That would be Johnny Roselli, a “man of honor” in the Sicilian tradition who worked for the Chicago family interests in Los Angeles under the supervision of Sam Giancana, and who also worked with William Harvey on matters of intense national security. Roselli knew JFK, and, in fact, was instrumental in helping introduce him to Sam Giancana’s mistress, who soon became a carrier pigeon between the two, sending messages back and forth while Kennedy plotted his peace missions. Meanwhile, the CIA was plotting how to capture the heroin franchise from French control in Indochina. (Soon, any poppy fields not under CIA protection would be bombed out of existence.) Strange that Roselli would become an assassin of JFK. Roselli was sent to babysit Giancana’s mistress after the event. She was hysterical and Giancana was afraid she might talk to someone. Most of the other potential whistle-blowers were just whacked.

During this period, Roselli would drift in and out of my hometown, Champaign-Urbana, Illinois. One of his favorite mistresses ran the local newspaper (where I worked on weekends)  and television station. And when she needed someone to whack her philandering husband, she went first to Harvey, who was living in Indiana. Harvey turned down the assignment, so Roselli took care of it. None of this would be revealed until decades later, after all the principle characters were dead.

Ian Fleming was a real British James Bond, by the way. He handled a lot of the most sensitive undercover agents, including Aleister Crowley. His books are Cold War cartoon fantasies, however, as Fleming did not want to spill the beans on any real secrets, although he might have been able to offer some insight into SIS operations inside the USA. Funny how British spies are never uncovered or talked about in the media, especially the really famous ones from history, like Aaron Burr and Benjamin Franklin.