Who was Shakespeare, really?

There’s a lot of interest in unveiling the real Shakespeare these days. That man from Avon was the business manager for one of the most famous acting companies of the day and had a well-documented life as a minor businessman, but no evidence he was actually a writer. The longest signed document was his will, in which he carefully catalogued all his possessions, which strangely, did not include a single book nor important manuscript. As a writer, I can assure you we keep copies of our creations.

When the man from Avon died, the world was silent. It wasn’t until seven years later that Ben Jonson wrote the intro to the first folio. But what if Jonson was really in on the gag and protecting the real story?
The man from Avon had two daughters, one of whom bizarrely appears to have been functionally illiterate. More important, however, for a commoner with no documented travel nor education, it is inconceivable the man from Avon could have absorbed all the details or had access to the wealth of information on a wide variety of subjects, or had such insight into the ways of the royals. Most likely it was a team, and included a woman because the female characters are so well crafted. Women were not allowed involvement with the theater at the time, which might help explain a need to remain anonymous. Likely, at least one man was involved, and perhaps more.

Edward de Vere was patron of the greatest acting troupe of the day, known as Oxford’s Men (de Vere was the Earl of Oxford), while the other group, The King’s Men, included Shakespeare as actor and business manager. The patron of the King’s Men was Henry Carey, who had a mistress 20 years younger than himself, Emilia Bassano, the most famous female poet of the age. Another female candidate is Mary Sidney, whose groundbreaking play Antonius revived interest in classical soliloquy. Sidney founded the most influential literary salon in the history of English literature and the most creative minds communed at her salon at Wilton House.

After having solved many mysteries, like the origins of the Holy Grail (born on the Hemp Road linking Europe with the East), Jay Gould’s involvement in the Lincoln assassination, JM/Wave’s involvement in the JFK assassination, my spotlight has turned onto the Shakespeare controversy.

Obviously the man from Avon does not have the CV for producing the work, and I believe only a team could cover the vast territory involved. My current thesis is a council overseen by Queen Elizabeth produced Shakespeare, and this group included another women or two, and at least one talented man, such as Francis Bacon.

The man from Avon died in 1616 and the first folio creating his legacy was not published until seven years later, when the mythology was first laid down by Ben Jonson, who strangely had said nothing seven years earlier when his supposed great friend passed away. Strange also how the man from Avon knew no other famous writers, and never appeared at any of the literary salons of the era. No one else famous seems to have known him. And strange how new work continued to be published after his death.

The first portrait of Shakespeare appeared in that folio and his facial features strongly resemble a mask, and, in fact, a distinct mask outline is included.

The Authorship issue,” says Lorenzo Geraldo, “is based on greed and continued misunderstanding ever since David Garrick came to Stratford in 1769 and started the illusion of William Shaksper as author of the Plays. Stratford is a tax haven for the Crown from the Tourist industry. Oxfordians continue to sell their water down by the river to naive newcomers. Edward de Vere is easily eliminated as he died way too early in 1604 before many of the plays were written. There are references in the plays that took place after 1604. Bacon on the other hand lived till 1626 and was there for the production of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio. Bacon left actual evidence behind with the only Shakespeare related diary or notebook, The Promus, that contains over 3 thousand unique Shakespeare phrases jotted down in his own handwriting that precedes the Plays publication and stage performances. This gag book would be a greater mystery if Bacon wasn’t Shakespeare. Yes there was collaboration, Ben Jonson is the key as he worked and lived with Francis Bacon after his impeachment. Jonson called Bacon, “The Chief” and wrote admiringly of Bacon’s mind and talents as did many other friends of Bacon’s who referred to himself as “a concealed poet.””

Watch the film below.
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aZ_cuc8OS4s