Can democracy make a comeback?

340px-George-orwell-BBCGeorge Orwell was a huge influence on my early journalism career as his book Animal Farm contributed to my early resolve never to fall under the spell of Marxism. But when it came to Orwell’s famous confrontation with Henry Miller in Paris (debating the merits of joining the fight against fascism in Spain), I came firmly down on Miller’s side of remaining a pacifist. Orwell was soon shot through the throat, and fortunately miraculously recovered with his voice intact, enabling him to assume a prosperous career as a commentator for the BBC.
I’ve already exposed Orwell’s mysterious connections, and the possibility he was working for MI6. (Journalists make some of the best spooks.) Orwell always cited Somerset Maugham as his biggest influence, and that was long before Maugham was unmasked as an agent of MI6. Upon his deathbed Orwell gave a full confession regarding every spook he knew and who they worked for as best as he could determine. He was a patriotic citizen to the end, although his last book ended with a bold flourish, for it exposed cynical insights into the emerging national security state post-WWII, a system closer to fascism on steroids than democracy.
600px-1984_Social_Classes_alt.svgThe great insight of 1984 was that the revolution was secretly orchestrated by the state in order to ID and neutralize budding revolutionaries. It was all part of a grand charade. There never was any real hope of reform. The world had been carved into oligarchies that shifted alliances to maintain perpetual war. In the book, random terror is created by missiles raining down on the city periodically, although we know suicide bombers are cheaper and harder to trace through the wilderness of mirrors, which is why they are the preferred instruments of modern state-sponsored terror. But Orwell’s analysis of the social strata was off considerably because as the security states grew stronger, the upper strata of the oligarchy got progressively smaller. Today’s chart has .01% at the top, and a mere 1% occupying the second rung. The middle class has effectively been melted into the proletariat, creating the new 99% working class stiffs.
Most people imagine Orwell as the protagonist of 1984, but I can more easily imagine him as identifying with the leader of the fake opposition delivering the protagonist to the Ministry of Truth for his re-indoctrination mind-control.
On the dawn of a new year, I wonder if a cycle of change might not be on the horizon and the power of the .01% to call the shots might not be fading somewhat. As an indication of this novel trend, I cite the difficulty of Jeb Bush and Hillary Clinton to corral the next election exclusively for the old guard. At the same time, one must carefully evaluate any messiahs before selecting one as real because the so-called whistleblowers covered by the mass media are spooks. Real whistleblowers are eliminated and discredited (just google Danny Casolaro) and never appear on the cover of Time magazine.
I feel a glimmer of hope our millennials might one day rise above petty earthly attachments long enough to shatter Monsanto’s toxic influence over our economy, rip the profit motive out of the medical establishment, and invest our wealth in free schools and hospitals, not wars of aggression over oil and opium. Technology has provided the solution, and the Internet can easily be deployed for a weekly or even daily referendum process, in which national opinion could shape shots before they get called.
 

Somerset Maugham was a spook

Somerset Maugham was well on his way to becoming a doctor when he published a novel and after the first edition sold out in a week, he chucked his career in medicine and became the highest-paid author in England, forging a trail now ruled by J.K. Rowling. It wasn’t until recently that MI6 admitted Somerset was a spook.

While frauds like Mark Passio scare people with complex dogmas constructed out of coincidence, I will reveal the real secrets of brainwashing. Somerset had an agenda and inspired Ian Fleming to create the dashing James Bond, but that’s another story.

Very early in his career, Somerset wrote a book titled The Magician, a thinly-veiled attack on Aleister Crowley, accusing him of ritual murder and other unspeakable acts of black magic. Strange that eventually both these characters would be unmasked as agents of MI6, which leads to the possibility their little mini-war may have been staged all along. Crowley’s sinister reputation was sealed by Somerset’s book. It made Crowley famous, while splitting the world into two factions, one fearing, despising and hating Crowley; the other just wanting to learn his secrets.

After the first World War, there were a lot of PTSD-damaged Americans left behind in Europe seeking healing and many were self-medicating with alcohol, hash and opium. Somerset wrote a highly influential book about these times titled The Razor’s Edge, and that book, like his one on Crowley, left many false impressions that linger today.

When I think of Somerset, I picture him as Herbert Marshal, the English actor who played him in the original 1946 movie. In fact, a new hardback edition of the book was soon published, and it used the two lead actors from the film for the cover. Marshal captured Somerset’s homosexuality in a very understated and elegant manner, although he ignored Somerset’s stuttering problem.
But the book and film actually led people away from enlightenment, while pretending to point them in the right direction.

This is because intoxication is painted as the greatest evil. The protagonist winds up in India seeking enlightenment and is told by a swami to meditate alone in a cave until he reaches some satori moment, after which he returns to Paris an expert in mind control and hypnosis. He winds up trying to stop a friend from medicating herself and when he discovers her in a hash and opium den, gets into a huge fistfight while attempting to remove her from the scene.

Because of this film, millions of young people around the world were led to believe enlightenment could be found on a mountain top in Tibet, and not through sacramental substances.

Which happens to be the reverse of the real situation. Yes, deep meditation can be very useful and may be required to quiet a restless mind, but the magical and medicinal plants are important tools deserving respect. The guru portrayed by Somerset did not really plunge into real enlightenment at all, and was a one-dimensional caricature who paved the way for a parade of charlatans to profiteer off popularizing Eastern philosophies.

Whenever I find an effort to lead people away from cannabis and other medicinal plants, I suspect the forces of propaganda may be at work. Had Somerset really wanted to enlighten people, he would have been explaining how wars were staged for profit and social control, and the prohibition of medicinal plants was just a part of the scam to reap higher profits and construct monopolies.

This is how paradigms are actually forged and how memes are seeded into the mass media by intelligence operations. And the wonderful thing about the Internet is how all this information is gradually being filtered and processed so as to make it harder to conceal such operations in the future.


The Truth About Aleister Crowley

Crowley grew up rich, but after his father died of cancer when the lad was 11, his life changed direction rapidly. Crowley rejected his Christian upbringing and became fond of drugs and prostitutes and devoted himself to hedonism. He studied alchemy, and took much from Francois Rabelais, including the slogan “do what thou wilt” and the name of his eventual philosophy, “Thelema,” based largely on Rabelais, who wrote extensively on the virtues of marijuana, although Rabelais had to disguise the plant in code due to the Vatican’s ban on writing or speaking about cannabis.

Crowley’s background in ceremonial magic really starts with his introduction to the Golden Dawn society. Crowley was eventually drummed out of that organization. It was inevitable Crowley would get control of his own secret society at some point, although he continued to pick up degrees in as many magical societies as possible. It should be noted he was a devoted 33rd degree Freemason.

The OTO Crowley eventually took over began in Germany as a revival of the Illuminati, and Crowley seems to have been a double agent pretending to support Germany while actually working for MI6. At some point, Crowley crossed the line by claiming magic powers that didn’t exist, possibly as an intelligence operation, as this sort of hoodwink seems to be standard operating procedure for setting up mystics supervised by counterintelligence.

I imagine an intelligence connection could have begun soon after Crowley went to India to study meditation and yoga. After they conquered India, England moved swiftly to leverage control over established religions, something easily accomplished by offering a few crumbs of assistance.

After establishing himself as a yoga master, Crowley got married and moved to Egypt, where he made telepathic contact with the Egyptian god of magic, Thoth. I could take this seriously if Crowley’s career at this point was just recognized as an author of  “science fiction,” but I’m afraid he intended his disciples to believe he routinely opened doors to other dimensions of time and space with the help of drugs and forbidden sex. The Process Church and Weathermen deployed those same tools to condition their mental slaves.

Crowley claimed all sorts of magical powers. Meanwhile, among polite society in England, it’s understood not to leave your kids alone with Crowley, as his conduct knows no moral guidelines. Somerset Maugham (another spook) would write a novel, The Magician, asserting that ritual murder was part of Crowley’s bag of tricks. You see, some sorcerers believe if they kill someone, their soul can be transmuted into psychic energy making the dark magician all that more powerful. In fact, however, Crowley was known as being wicked simply because he handed out cannabis and cocaine and encouraged their use, and was open about his bisexuality. He also predicted the end of fundamentalist religion and return to paganism. His writings about “child sacrifice” were actually his sly reference to masturbation. Many of the accusations against him have been twisted beyond all recognition. Since Maugham was an intelligence operative, and his book put Crowley on the map as the preeminent black magician, it’s possible their confrontations were all staged as part of some complex operation.

It seems that the old money super rich have always been fascinated by magic and easily suckered out of their money by a good seance, so it wasn’t long before people inside the oligarchy developed an interest in Crowley. We don’t know when exactly he went to work for British intelligence as a secret agent, but when he came to America, his mission seems to have been to spy on German spies. He seems to have been involved in the plot to sink the Lusitania, which was done to bring the US into England’s war. He also may have been involved in the mysterious defection of Rudolf Hess and several other major intrigues during WWII. He supposedly invented the “V” sign used by Churchill as a magical device against Hitler. His impact on paganism and Wicca is comparable to Albert Pike’s influence on Masonry.

In fact, organized occultism is just the flip side of the coin on organized religion, and neither one holds any monopolies on enlightenment. It’s interesting that Crowley’s devotees can so easily pierce the hoodwinks of Christianity, but fail to see similar hoodwinks in Crowley’s magic. Magic and religion are the same thing, and both sides of this wedge are stuffed with intelligence operations.

A revealing detail of Crowley’s limitations was his glaring failure to uncover the true recipe for the Oil of Abramelin, which was based on the holy anointing oil of the Hebrews. According to Crowley, the magic substance contained the following:

  • 8 parts Cinnamon essential oil
  • 4 parts Myrrh essential oil
  • 2 parts Galangal essential oil
  • 7 parts Olive oil

In fact, there was no Galangal in the ancient recipe and the main ingredient of the oil was undoubtedly cannabis, although throughout the middle ages “calamus” was substituted. The study of the sacred oil leads into the history of the holy grail as the story has its roots in Scythia centuries before the rise of Christianity. Crowley failed to uncover any of this history, despite his fondness for smoking cannabis.

If there’s a Crowley in England today, his name is David Icke, who also claims special magical powers. According to Icke, the royal family is really composed of shape-shifting alien reptiles from another dimension that only Icke is allowed to see. Believe it or not, Icke has a huge fan base and is hard at work trying to capture the center of energy on conspiracy research, despite being such an obvious disinfo agent or quack, take your pick. Claiming special magical powers might get you some prestige inside the oligarchies, but for me, it’s always an indicator of hoodwink in progress. By the end of this life, Crowley had become a bit of a joke inside British intel, and they considered him little more than a pawn to be used in misdirection ops. Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond, was his handler at the end.

Of course, a huge cult has developed around Crowley. They don’t see him as an agent of British intel claiming special powers. They view him as the most enlightened man in the universe. Crowley left a troubled legacy and some of his followers twist his philosophy for evil. So he’s mostly known today as the founder of modern Satanism and a convenient scapegoat. I’m sure Crowley would be happy with this role. In the meantime, if you’re looking for true enlightenment, or just a happy and well-adjusted life, I’d advise not falling too deeply under his control.