Origins of Psychedelic Music

 

Cage staged a “happening” at the Stock Pavilion in Urbana after a Beat symposium was held at the University of Illinois.

Summer 1966. A Beat symposium is held at the University of Illinois where John Cage is artist in residence.

A local Countess who had a long-running affair with John Roselli is the most powerful person in town not connected to the University. Among other holdings, she owns the local newspaper and TV station, and frequently jet-sets off to Europe, LA, and Palm Beach, when not holding court at the Champaign Country Club.

After the Italian Count she lifted out of poverty (to buy her title through marriage) was caught poking his secretary, she fired him. He fled back to Italy to plot his divorce settlement, but ended up with a bullet in the brain courtesy of Handsome Johnny.

Bill Harvey had been the first assassin she’d approached and declined. Roselli did not, however, and did it for free because the Countess had recently bank-rolled his return from Federal prison. Her empire was supervised by a local lawyer who was also the only known conduit to the Chicago mob.

Local teen Joe Sanderson was backpacking around the world. He would eventually become one of two Americans killed fighting for the Salvadorian revolution. David Foster Wallace had just entered classes at Yankee Ridge elementary, in the newly built suburb for the University of Illinois faculty. He would become one of the most celebrated novelists of his generation.

Spokesperson for the newly forged John Birch society, whose odd name was a palindrome, could be seen slinking around campus in trench coat and fedora, from one conspiratorial meeting to the next. He had recently testified before the Warren Commission. His house on West Ohio Street radiated with spooky vibrations, and children were cautioned to keep clear lest they be subjected to a sermon on the dangers of globalization.

A British noble, Sir Thomas  Willes Chitty 3rd, had recently arrived in town, intent on taking acid and having sex with the hottest super hottie he could find, on or off campus.

Allen Ginsberg informs the leather-coated, long-haired teens attending the Beat conference that his first psychedelic experience was on glue and this leads to a rush to Lincoln Square to buy glue and then to the barn at the Shirley Farm where they hold their secret beer and wine-fueled ceremonies, only this time with glue, and out pops Only Me, an amazing song, written by 15-year-old Mark Warwick, the first psychedelic anthem I ever heard, a song that urged everyone to “let their minds be free.”

The word “psychedelic” was coined in the mid-fifties in a letter from Humphry Osmond to Aldous Huxley. Osmond gave mescaline to Huxley in LA and Huxley soon wrote The Doors of Perception. Both men began looking for a word to describe their experiences with altered states. The book’s title came from England’s greatest visionary poet.

“If the doors of perception were cleansed everything would appear to man as it is, Infinite. For man has closed himself up, till he sees all things thro’ narrow chinks of his cavern.”― William Blake, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell.

Huxley suggested “phanerothyme,” from the Greek words for “to show” and “spirit.” 

“To make this mundane world sublime, take half a gram of phanerothyme.”

But Osmond chose “psyche” (for mind or soul) and deloun (for show). 

“To fathom Hell or soar angelic, just take a pinch of psychedelic.” 

Huxley on his first mescaline trip courtesy of British Intelligence.

Osmond announced the new word at the New York Academy of Sciences meeting in 1957. That same year, R. Gordon Wasson, a vice president at JP Morgan, published a photo essay in Life magazine detailing a trip to Mexico to imbibe mushrooms with a Mazatec shaman.

Wasson would go on to publish a ridiculous book claiming Soma of the Rig Veda was a mushroom. This rabbit hole concealed the real identity of Soma, which was cannabis mixed with milk and spices, something known as bhang in India. At the time, Wasson was in close contact with intelligence agent Dr. Andrija Puharich who would soon be arranging seances with the rich and famous. Puharich had been a frequent visitor to Fort Detrick, where the CIA’s MK/Ultra project had originated. He would later become the biggest booster of fake Israeli psychic Uri Geller.

For those teens seeking a mind-altering experience in the early 1960s, Huxley’s book was often the first step. The rock band The Doors took their name from the book. Jim Morrison’s talents were staggering and their psychedelic jams were among the best of the era for evoking a mystical experience. All fueled by the band’s extensive tripping together. When I think of Morrison in the late sixties, I also think of Jean Michel Basquiat in the late eighties. They both died young, but left a massive body of work.

But in 1964, Timothy Leary had captured the center of gravity by publishing The Psychedelic Experience. Sadly the book was a complete mess of no use to anyone and inscrutable to the average teen as Finnegan’s Wake. Really it was just a money grab. Leary lifted ancient material from Tibet, so there wasn’t much original writing to do. The book led people into a rabbit hole and did zero to enhance enlightenment.

Leary’s book was nothing like Huxley’s poetic account of the spiritual effects of mescaline or Osmond’s descriptions of Native American peyote ceremonies, or Wasson’s description of the shamanistic use of magic mushrooms.

Instead Leary guided the youth (including the Beatles) to look east for enlightenment. It’s the same basic hoodwink laid down in The Razor’s Edge by British secret agent Somerset Maugham, who, like Osmond, worked for MI6. One thing about the early history of psychedelic studies is that most of the major players turned out to be secretly working for MI6, the CIA, or both.

The cliche of the bearded yogi living in a cave in the mountains who meditates until he reaches some satori moment and is transported to a permanent state of bliss is total jive. The religions of east and west are equally corrupt, run by oligarchies, and exist mostly to make money and ensnare acolytes. The Buddhists are perhaps the least corrupted (although there are good and bad in all cultures), but all talk of eternal life is complete bunk. Nothing lasts forever. There is no soul, no nirvana. But if you want to get popular fast, tell the people what they want to hear. If you are looking for enlightenment, take Zoroaster’s advice and just be as kind and empathetic in thought, word and deed as you possibly can. But also realize no state of bliss can last forever, and there is no bliss without an opposite: so everyone is vulnerable to spurts of paranoia, rage and jealousy and other states of mind from the dark side.

Westerners are used to looking east for enlightenment because eastern traditions are older and thought to be wiser. The Zoroastrians invented the word “magic,” and were among the first to learn the secrets of higher math, something learned through a study of harmony. They were also the most advanced astronomers and chemists of their time.

During the enlightenment era, secret societies based on eastern mysticism were all the rage and many fraudulent books were conceived purporting to reveal the true secrets of the universe. All these efforts were hoodwinks and money grabs.

Just as the emergence of psychedelics was carefully stage-managed by intelligence agencies, so was the evolution of these occult societies. Aleister Crowley was one of the first to declare himself an advanced yogi with magic powers out of The Razor’s Edge. In fact, it was Maugham who made Crowley famous through a novel titled The Magician. They were both secret agents plying dialectical games to advance secret agendas.

Groupies try to get close to the Beatles in LA.

Meanwhile, after Harrison laid down a raga in “She, Said” garage rockers across America began tinkering with eastern scales.

The 13th Floor Elevators were the first to use the word “psychedelic” in an album title in 1966 and had a minor hit with their first single, but never really fully penetrated outside Texas until Lenny Kaye released Nuggets. The Texas bands of the time had a distinctive sound with a lot of fast picking on the fat strings. The cowboy guitarist had been an icon for generations. Texas rock and surf rock shared similarities, but there were no eastern scales in Texas at the time. The first song to reference LSD was released by in 1960 by surf rockers, The Gamblers.

Mark Warwick’s song Only Me is a better example of psychedelic rock than Your Gonna Miss Me. Both songs were written in 1966.

Other songs in this vein also released in 1966 would include East West by Paul Butterfield Blues Band, a jam devised by Mike Bloomfield after his first gig in San Francisco, where he could have bumped into a slew of bands working on defining an emerging genre; and, of course Section 43 by Country Joe and the Fish, ranks high on the list of early psychedelia. The appearance of cheap, portable organs from England and Italy played a major role in crafting a psychedelic ambience, and most of the original psychedelic bands made use of either the Vox or the less expensive Farfisa.

In November of 1966, Bronx-based band Blues Magoos released the album Psychedelic Lollypop, which included the hit song We Ain’t Got Nothing Yet, which rose to #5 on the charts, far higher than anything by the 13th Floor Elevators. Ralph Scala on Vox and lead vocals.

One of the first novels to contain a description of having sex on LSD, it was written by a visiting Baron from England and set entirely in Champaign-Urbana, IL. The longhaired, leather-jacketed teens who pioneered the local garage rock scene make a brief appearance guarding the beer stash in the fridge at a student-faculty party.

The following year, Strawberry Alarm Clock and West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band would form in LA, and H.P. Lovecraft in Chicago, while the Finchley Boys (Warwick’s band) would travel to San Francisco and become adopted by the Cockettes as “the next big thing,” only soon to break apart.

But it was the Cockettes themselves who became the next big thing as they launched glitter rock in a trip to New York City in 1971. Had the Finchleys hung around and gone on that voyage, they might have been as big as the New York Dolls. Glitter would eventually usurp psychedelia as the next big thing, and by the time punk rock appeared, the mystical excesses of acid rock were soundly rejected in favor of a return to more primitive garage rock.

After Peter Fonda gave Lennon and Harrison some Sandoz in LA in 1965, out popped She Said, She Said.

Roger McGuinn and David Crosby of the Byrds were also there tripping. McCartney did not imbibe and left the later session when they were recording the song in a huff, refusing to contribute. In the week that followed their first trip, Lennon and Harrison could not relate to the other two because acid had changed them so profoundly. Although McCartney was the last to drop acid, he was the first to inform the public, which annoyed Lennon and Harrison.

Guy Maynard was the leader of the Seeds of Doubt, the principle rival to the Finchley Boys. In 2010, he wrote one of the best descriptions of an LSD trip in a book set in 1969 in Boston with flashbacks to 1966 in Champaign-Urbana.

She Said, She Said is an amazing tune that shifts from 4/4 to 3/4 while deploying a sitar scale. The seeds of acid rock were planted in Rubber Soul with a brief sitar solo, used only for its distinctive tone.  It was David Crosby who showed Harrison how to play raga scales on an acoustic guitar. He also suggested Harrison check out a dude named Ravi Shankar.

They kicked Fonda out of the party for talking incessantly about his gunshot wound in the stomach and how he was momentarily dead on the operating table from blood loss. Lennon was horrified and when Fonda showed the bullet wound, he said, “You make me feel like I’ve never been born.” Fonda’s talk of death while Lennon was tripping is reminiscent of Leary’s use of the Tibetan Book of the Dead as a tripping manual, something that undoubtedly led to some seriously bad trips. Pushing that sort of dogma on western teens was the equivalent of distributing The Book of Revelation to teens in India as a true road to enlightenment.

Compare the intro to Eight Miles High to the opening moments of Coltrane’s Africa/Brass album, released in 1961. Some critics believe The Byrds wrote the first real psychedelic song. It counterpoints some Texas-style fast picking with an open D played on a 12-string. That chiming D would soon appear over and over in songs like Hey, Joe by the Leaves and Going All the Way by the Squires. Many attributed the sound to Bob Dylan, but Dylan claims it was all the Byrds covering his songs, and he had nothing to do with spreading the chiming D chord.

Southern California is where LSD landed because the film business has long had deep connections to military intelligence. Fonda starred in the first LSD film, The Trip, but there were others in Hollywood getting a supply of LSD-25 from Sandoz chemists who secretly worked under CIA supervision. The real acid guru in California was John Griggs, founder of the Brotherhood of Eternal Love, and he got the acid by stealing it from the fridge of an LA film producer. Griggs would soon turn up dead and his group swiftly usurped by intel operative Ron Stark.

Can democracy make a comeback?

340px-George-orwell-BBCGeorge Orwell was a huge influence on my early journalism career as his book Animal Farm contributed to my early resolve never to fall under the spell of Marxism. But when it came to Orwell’s famous confrontation with Henry Miller in Paris (debating the merits of joining the fight against fascism in Spain), I came firmly down on Miller’s side of remaining a pacifist. Orwell was soon shot through the throat, and fortunately miraculously recovered with his voice intact, enabling him to assume a prosperous career as a commentator for the BBC.
I’ve already exposed Orwell’s mysterious connections, and the possibility he was working for MI6. (Journalists make some of the best spooks.) Orwell always cited Somerset Maugham as his biggest influence, and that was long before Maugham was unmasked as an agent of MI6. Upon his deathbed Orwell gave a full confession regarding every spook he knew and who they worked for as best as he could determine. He was a patriotic citizen to the end, although his last book ended with a bold flourish, for it exposed cynical insights into the emerging national security state post-WWII, a system closer to fascism on steroids than democracy.
600px-1984_Social_Classes_alt.svgThe great insight of 1984 was that the revolution was secretly orchestrated by the state in order to ID and neutralize budding revolutionaries. It was all part of a grand charade. There never was any real hope of reform. The world had been carved into oligarchies that shifted alliances to maintain perpetual war. In the book, random terror is created by missiles raining down on the city periodically, although we know suicide bombers are cheaper and harder to trace through the wilderness of mirrors, which is why they are the preferred instruments of modern state-sponsored terror. But Orwell’s analysis of the social strata was off considerably because as the security states grew stronger, the upper strata of the oligarchy got progressively smaller. Today’s chart has .01% at the top, and a mere 1% occupying the second rung. The middle class has effectively been melted into the proletariat, creating the new 99% working class stiffs.
Most people imagine Orwell as the protagonist of 1984, but I can more easily imagine him as identifying with the leader of the fake opposition delivering the protagonist to the Ministry of Truth for his re-indoctrination mind-control.
On the dawn of a new year, I wonder if a cycle of change might not be on the horizon and the power of the .01% to call the shots might not be fading somewhat. As an indication of this novel trend, I cite the difficulty of Jeb Bush and Hillary Clinton to corral the next election exclusively for the old guard. At the same time, one must carefully evaluate any messiahs before selecting one as real because the so-called whistleblowers covered by the mass media are spooks. Real whistleblowers are eliminated and discredited (just google Danny Casolaro) and never appear on the cover of Time magazine.
I feel a glimmer of hope our millennials might one day rise above petty earthly attachments long enough to shatter Monsanto’s toxic influence over our economy, rip the profit motive out of the medical establishment, and invest our wealth in free schools and hospitals, not wars of aggression over oil and opium. Technology has provided the solution, and the Internet can easily be deployed for a weekly or even daily referendum process, in which national opinion could shape shots before they get called.
 

The novelist was a spook

Somerset Maugham was well on his way to becoming a doctor when he published a novel and after the first edition sold out in a week, he chucked his career in medicine and evolved into the highest-paid author in England, forging a trail now ruled by J.K. Rowling. It wasn’t until recently that MI6 admitted Maugham was a spook.

While frauds like Mark Passio attempt to frighten people with complex dogmas constructed out of coincidence, I will herein reveal the real secrets of brainwashing. Maugham had an agenda and helped inspire the creation of James Bond with his earlier dashing secret agent named Ashenden, who deployed trickery and blackmail to achieve goals, rather than murder.

Before joining the Red Cross Ambulance crew, where he was allegedly recruited into the secret services, Maugham wrote a book titled The Magician, a thinly-veiled attack on Aleister Crowley, accusing him of ritual murder and other unspeakable acts of black magic. Strange that eventually both these characters would be unmasked as agents of MI6, which leads to the possibility their little mini-war could have been staged all along. The book made Crowley famous, while splitting the world into two factions, one fearing, despising and hating Crowley; the other wanting to learn his secrets. It introduced an entire generation to the obscure occult bibles, books Crowley had raided to create his alternative to Christianity. Strangely, however, it ignored Crowley’s principle influence, French priest and alchemist François Rabelais, who introduced the mythical Abbey of Thelema, where enlightened monks did as they wished, provided they harmed none. Crowley ignored that last part, however. He did not believe hurting people was an obstacle to enlightenment.

Although Crowley became somewhat corpulent later in life, Maugham’s book falsely painted him as obese. It mostly portrayed him as an evil enigma with mysterious powers. “Another strange thing about him was the impossibility of telling if he was serious,” writes the narrator. “There was a mockery in that queer glance, a sardonic smile upon the mouth, which made you hesitate how to take his outrageous utterances.”

Both Crowley and Maugham were bisexual and England’s greatest literary talent (Oscar Wilde) had only recently been jailed and financially ruined for committing sodomy, even though like many other gays in England at the time, he’d married and sired children. The painter Gerald Kelly (brother to Crowley’s first wife) introduced Crowley to the bohemian expats at Le Chat Blanc, a crew that included Maugham, who formed an instant negative impression based on Crowley’s towering ego and affection for cannabis and opium, both of which Maugham detested as “oriental intoxicants.”

“Magic is no more than the art of employing consciously invisible means to produce visible effects,” says Oliver Haddo, the Crowley character in the book. “Will, love and imagination are magic powers that everyone possesses; and whoever knows how to develop them to the fullest extent is a magician.”

One imagines some of these quotes originated straight from Crowley’s mouth during drinking sessions in a Paris bistro. When asked how one accesses magic powers, Haddo replies: “They are enumerated in a Hebrew manuscript of the sixteenth century, which is in my possession. The privileges of him who holds in his right hand the Keys of Solomon and in his left hand the Branch of the Blossoming Almond, are these twenty-one. He beholds God face-to-face without dying, and converses intimately with the Seven Genni who command the celestial army.” Just a fancy way of saying it’s all done with a secret book of Hebrew spells and magic wand.

In the novel, Haddo hypnotizes, marries, and then murders a virgin so he might harvest her soul to create new life. Crowley responded to the book by exposing the magical sections influenced by Eliphas Levi and other famous occultists, accusing Maugham of plagiarism. Today most of those appropriations would probably fall under “fair use.” Crowley then went on to write a book on cannabis under the name Oliver Haddo. All the chapters open with quotes from Zoroaster taken from the Avesta. In his Confessions, Crowley wrote: The Magician was, in fact, an appreciation of my genius such as I had never dreamed of inspiring. It showed me how sublime were my ambitions and reassured me on a point which sometimes worried me, whether my work was worth while in a worldly sense.”

Crowley probably enjoyed the book because Maugham did not seek to expose him as a hoodwinker faking powers, but a real magician. Yet despite his encyclopedic knowledge of all things occult, Crowley never realized haoma of the Avesta and soma of the Rig Veda were references to cannabis. He specialized in ceremonies involving the oil of Abramelin, also known as the holy anointing oil of Moses, but his formula replaced the primary ingredient (cannabis) with galangal, which is not psychoactive, which is why you can buy Crowley’s recipe online but not the real thing.

It doesn’t matter if you choose Christianity or occultism, both are equally corrupted by hoodwinks and neither side holds a monopoly on magic or spiritual truth. The real secret to magic and religion is it only works on believers, and hoodwinks are needed to capture and contain believers. In this self-fulfilling prophecy, one gets a lot farther faking divine power and promising eternal life than one gets admitting we don’t know what happens after death. The most likely scenario is nothing happens. The concept of an eternal soul is comforting but defies the laws of the universe, where nothing lasts forever and change the only constant.

After the first World War, there were a lot of PTSD-damaged Americans left behind in Europe seeking healing and many were self-medicating with hash and opium. After joining the secret service, Maugham wrote a highly influential book about these times, The Razor’s Edge, and that book, like his one on Crowley, left many false impressions that linger today. It also delved into oriental mysticism, only this time the magician was a good guy.

When I think of Maugham, I picture him as Herbert Marshal, the English actor who played him in the original 1946 movie. Marshal captured Maugham’s homosexuality in a very understated and elegant manner, although he ignored his stuttering. But instead of conferring a path to enlightenment, the book and film led people away from it.

I say this is because intoxication is painted as the greatest evil. The protagonist winds up in India seeking the meaning of life and is instructed by a sadhu to meditate alone in a cave until reaching satori, after which he returns to Paris an expert in hypnosis. He attempts to stop a grieving friend from medicating herself by dragging her out of a hash and opium den. Because of this film, millions of people around the world were led to believe enlightenment could be found in a cave on a mountain top in Tibet, and not through intoxicating substances.

Which happens to be the reverse of the truth. Yes, deep meditation can be useful and may be required to quiet a restless mind, but the magical and medicinal plants are important tools deserving respect. Cannabis is at the root of almost all religion, including occultism. Maugham’s guru was a one-dimensional caricature who paved the way for a parade of charlatans to profiteer off popularizing Eastern meditation techniques.

Whenever I find an effort to lead people away from cannabis, I suspect the forces of propaganda are secretly at work. Had Maugham really wanted to enlighten people, he would have explained how wars are staged for profit, and how prohibition of medicinal plants is a scam to reap higher profits while demonizing users. But this sort of information is held close to the vest by the secret services. There’s a reason why Britannia rules both magic and spy-craft and it’s because those two arts have always been joined at the hip.

The Truth About Aleister Crowley

 

Crowley grew up rich, but after his father died of cancer when the lad was 11, his life changed direction rapidly. Crowley rejected his Christian upbringing and became fond of drugs and prostitutes and devoted himself to hedonism. He studied alchemy, and took much from Francois Rabelais, including the slogan “do what thou wilt” and the name of his eventual philosophy, “Thelema,” based largely on Rabelais, who wrote extensively on the virtues of marijuana, although Rabelais had to disguise the plant in code due to the Vatican’s ban on writing or speaking about cannabis.

Crowley’s background in ceremonial magic really starts with his introduction to the Golden Dawn society. Crowley was eventually drummed out of that organization. It was inevitable Crowley would get control of his own secret society at some point, although he continued to pick up degrees in as many magical societies as possible. It should be noted he was a devoted 33rd degree Freemason.

The OTO Crowley eventually took over began in Germany as a revival of the Illuminati, and Crowley seems to have been a double agent pretending to support Germany while actually working for MI6. At some point, Crowley crossed the line by claiming magic powers that didn’t exist, possibly as an intelligence operation, as this sort of hoodwink seems to be standard operating procedure for setting up mystics supervised by counterintelligence.

I imagine an intelligence connection could have begun soon after Crowley went to India to study meditation and yoga. After they conquered India, England moved swiftly to leverage control over established religions, something easily accomplished by offering a few crumbs of assistance.

After establishing himself as a yoga master, Crowley got married and moved to Egypt, where he made telepathic contact with the Egyptian god of magic, Thoth. I could take this seriously if Crowley’s career at this point was just recognized as an author of  “science fiction,” but I’m afraid he intended his disciples to believe he routinely opened doors to other dimensions of time and space with the help of drugs and forbidden sex. The Process Church and Weathermen deployed those same tools to condition their mental slaves.

Crowley claimed all sorts of magical powers. Meanwhile, among polite society in England, it’s understood not to leave your kids alone with Crowley, as his conduct knows no moral guidelines. Somerset Maugham (another spook) would write a novel, The Magician, asserting that ritual murder was part of Crowley’s bag of tricks. You see, some sorcerers believe if they kill someone, their soul can be transmuted into psychic energy making the dark magician all that more powerful. In fact, however, Crowley was known as being wicked simply because he handed out cannabis and cocaine and encouraged their use, and was open about his bisexuality. He also predicted the end of fundamentalist religion and return to paganism. His writings about “child sacrifice” were actually his sly reference to masturbation. Many of the accusations against him have been twisted beyond all recognition. Since Maugham was an intelligence operative, and his book put Crowley on the map as the preeminent black magician, it’s possible their confrontations were all staged as part of some complex operation.

It seems that the old money super rich have always been fascinated by magic and easily suckered out of their money by a good seance, so it wasn’t long before people inside the oligarchy developed an interest in Crowley. We don’t know when exactly he went to work for British intelligence as a secret agent, but when he came to America, his mission seems to have been to spy on German spies. He seems to have been involved in the plot to sink the Lusitania, which was done to bring the US into England’s war. He also may have been involved in the mysterious defection of Rudolf Hess and several other major intrigues during WWII. He supposedly invented the “V” sign used by Churchill as a magical device against Hitler. His impact on paganism and Wicca is comparable to Albert Pike’s influence on Masonry.

In fact, organized occultism is just the flip side of the coin on organized religion, and neither one holds any monopolies on enlightenment. It’s interesting that Crowley’s devotees can so easily pierce the hoodwinks of Christianity, but fail to see similar hoodwinks in Crowley’s magic. Magic and religion are the same thing, and both sides of this wedge are stuffed with intelligence operations.

A revealing detail of Crowley’s limitations was his glaring failure to uncover the true recipe for the Oil of Abramelin, which was based on the holy anointing oil of the Hebrews. According to Crowley, the magic substance contained the following:

  • 8 parts Cinnamon essential oil
  • 4 parts Myrrh essential oil
  • 2 parts Galangal essential oil
  • 7 parts Olive oil

In fact, there was no Galangal in the ancient recipe and the main ingredient of the oil was undoubtedly cannabis, although throughout the middle ages “calamus” was substituted. The study of the sacred oil leads into the history of the holy grail as the story has its roots in Scythia centuries before the rise of Christianity. Crowley failed to uncover any of this history, despite his fondness for smoking cannabis.

If there’s a Crowley in England today, his name is David Icke, who also claims special magical powers. According to Icke, the royal family is really composed of shape-shifting alien reptiles from another dimension that only Icke is allowed to see. Believe it or not, Icke has a huge fan base and is hard at work trying to capture the center of energy on conspiracy research, despite being such an obvious disinfo agent or quack, take your pick. Claiming special magical powers might get you some prestige inside the oligarchies, but for me, it’s always an indicator of hoodwink in progress. By the end of this life, Crowley had become a bit of a joke inside British intel, and they considered him little more than a pawn to be used in misdirection ops. Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond, was his handler at the end.

Of course, a huge cult has developed around Crowley. They don’t see him as an agent of British intel claiming special powers. They view him as the most enlightened man in the universe. Crowley left a troubled legacy and some of his followers twist his philosophy for evil. So he’s mostly known today as the founder of modern Satanism and a convenient scapegoat. I’m sure Crowley would be happy with this role. In the meantime, if you’re looking for true enlightenment, or just a happy and well-adjusted life, I’d advise not falling too deeply under his control.