Who was Shakespeare, really?

There’s a lot of interest in unveiling the real Shakespeare these days. That man from Avon was the business manager for one of the most famous acting companies of the day and had a well-documented life as a minor businessman, but no evidence he was actually a writer. The longest signed document was his will, in which he carefully catalogued all his possessions, which strangely, did not include a single book nor important manuscript. As a writer, I can assure you we keep copies of our creations.

When the man from Avon died, the world was silent. It wasn’t until seven years later that Ben Jonson wrote the intro to the first folio. But what if Jonson was really in on the gag and protecting the real story?
The man from Avon had two daughters, one of whom bizarrely appears to have been functionally illiterate. More important, however, for a commoner with no documented travel nor education, it is inconceivable the man from Avon could have absorbed all the details or had access to the wealth of information on a wide variety of subjects, or had such insight into the ways of the royals. Most likely it was a team, and included a woman because the female characters are so well crafted. Women were not allowed involvement with the theater at the time, which might help explain a need to remain anonymous. Likely, at least one man was involved, and perhaps more.

Edward de Vere was patron of the greatest acting troupe of the day, known as Oxford’s Men (de Vere was the Earl of Oxford), while the other group, The King’s Men, included Shakespeare as actor and business manager. The patron of the King’s Men was Henry Carey, who had a mistress 20 years younger than himself, Emilia Bassano, the most famous female poet of the age. Another female candidate is Mary Sidney, whose groundbreaking play Antonius revived interest in classical soliloquy. Sidney founded the most influential literary salon in the history of English literature and the most creative minds communed at her salon at Wilton House.

After having solved many mysteries, like the origins of the Holy Grail (born on the Hemp Road linking Europe with the East), Jay Gould’s involvement in the Lincoln assassination, JM/Wave’s involvement in the JFK assassination, my spotlight has turned onto the Shakespeare controversy.

Obviously the man from Avon does not have the CV for producing the work, and I believe only a team could cover the vast territory involved. My current thesis is a council overseen by Queen Elizabeth produced Shakespeare, and this group included another women or two, and at least one talented man, such as Francis Bacon.

The man from Avon died in 1616 and the first folio creating his legacy was not published until seven years later, when the mythology was first laid down by Ben Jonson, who strangely had said nothing seven years earlier when his supposed great friend passed away. Strange also how the man from Avon knew no other famous writers, and never appeared at any of the literary salons of the era. No one else famous seems to have known him. And strange how new work continued to be published after his death.

The first portrait of Shakespeare appeared in that folio and his facial features strongly resemble a mask, and, in fact, a distinct mask outline is included.

The Authorship issue,” says Lorenzo Geraldo, “is based on greed and continued misunderstanding ever since David Garrick came to Stratford in 1769 and started the illusion of William Shaksper as author of the Plays. Stratford is a tax haven for the Crown from the Tourist industry. Oxfordians continue to sell their water down by the river to naive newcomers. Edward de Vere is easily eliminated as he died way too early in 1604 before many of the plays were written. There are references in the plays that took place after 1604. Bacon on the other hand lived till 1626 and was there for the production of the 1623 Shakespeare First Folio. Bacon left actual evidence behind with the only Shakespeare related diary or notebook, The Promus, that contains over 3 thousand unique Shakespeare phrases jotted down in his own handwriting that precedes the Plays publication and stage performances. This gag book would be a greater mystery if Bacon wasn’t Shakespeare. Yes there was collaboration, Ben Jonson is the key as he worked and lived with Francis Bacon after his impeachment. Jonson called Bacon, “The Chief” and wrote admiringly of Bacon’s mind and talents as did many other friends of Bacon’s who referred to himself as “a concealed poet.””

Watch the film below.
  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aZ_cuc8OS4s

PEBL versus Elf

Give credit to the Elf for pioneering the concept of a solar-powered trike that can replace gas-guzzling cars for commuting and shopping locally.

A few years later, the PEBL was created as the Elf competitor. Last spring, however, Elf shut down their production and is currently seeking a financial rescue that may or may not come. Since hundreds of Elfs were sold over the past six years, it’s not difficult to find a used one on the Internet, often at a fraction of the $10k cost of buying a new one. The Elf started at half that price, but the cost kept rising as improvements were made and features added. Although the Elf is bigger and wider, remarkably, it weighs much less than the PEBL, which means it’s also easier to pedal. In fact, if the battery gives out, and you don’t have an outlet to plug into, or time to let the solar panel refill the battery (something that takes hours and hours), it’s not that difficult to operate the Elf on pedal power alone, something that would be far more difficult with a PEBL. My Elf also came with a variable transmission that’s far superior to the standard 8-speed transmission on the PEBL.

But on just about every other feature, the PEBL blows away the Elf, mostly due to its suspension system. The Elf works fine on flat level roads with no potholes, but the ride can be bone-jarring over bumps. The antler arms can also be difficult to wrestle over bumps. Not so with the PEBL, which is easily steered with one hand. The Elf has a more recumbent position, while riders are more upright in the PEBL. I prefer upright, but some others may prefer a more recumbent posture.

You won’t find many used PEBLs for sale, and the trike probably holds its value better, although if you are bargain hunting, it’s easy to locate a used Elf for a few thousand dollars, a great deal since many two-wheel ebikes cost over $5k. The PEBL battery is easier to charge and holds more juice. Also, the Elf has an open floor and unfinished interior, while the PEBL is fully enclosed and carpeted. The PEBL is more narrow and has a shorter turn radius, but that may also make it more susceptible to rollovers.

The PEBL is a four-season bike easily ridden through rain and snow, unlike the Elf which is designed for warmer weather. Remarkably, the price between the two was not very far apart, which accounts for the PEBL being a better value for the money, as well as a better-built bike.

As for modifications, I replaced the Elf mirrors with larger ones that folded in completely. On the PEBL, I put Batman logos over the BB logo on the front and seat. I’d urge BetterBike to explore a better logo. The Elf logo was stylized letters for Organic Transit, but many see it just as a “T” for “Tesla.” The PEBL also needed a strip of clear tape on the rear hatch hinge because it leaked rain water into the cabin.

Buel Frazier is a key to JFK’s assassination

Frazier on the day of the assassination prior to a 12-hour grilling in which he was falsely told Oswald named him a co-conspirator.

Buel Frazier was only 19 when he met Lee Harvey Oswald. They both worked at the Texas School Book Depository for minimum wage ($1.50) and Frazier sometimes drove Oswald the 15 miles to work if his broken-down Chevy was functional. The day of the assassination Oswald appeared with a two-foot-long package and told Frazier they were curtain rods. When they arrived at work, Oswald carried the package between his palm and armpit. Frazier never swallowed the story that short package was actually a 36-inch Mannlicher-Carcano rifle. Nor did he swallow the story that soft-spoken, highly intelligent Lee Oswald shot JFK that day.

A much different, longer package from the one Frazier had seen that morning was produced for the media. Enormous efforts were made to connect Oswald to the murder weapon, and some of this activity seems to have involved fabricating evidence as it went along, which is why there was so much revision. The problem with the enormous bag shown to the media is it was put together with tape from the book depository, indicating it wasn’t the bag Oswald carried because his bag had been manufactured off-site.

I have no doubt Oswald was instructed to bring a package to work that day because he was seen departing the scene in a green Rambler station wagon driven by David Morales, or someone who looked much like Morales. Two others might have been hiding on the floorboards inside, one of whom could have been Ted Shackley. Certainly that duo worked on a number of murderous missions over the years.

Frazier was put through a 12-hour hostile interrogation and told at one point that Oswald had named him as a co-conspirator. He demanded and eventually got a lie detector test, which he easily passed. However, the hostility of the police towards his belief in Oswald’s innocence caused Frazier to lie very low for a long time.

He was pressured to change his story and also change the length of the bag by the Warren Commission, but never wavered. The Commission eventually rejected his story and concluded his memory was not accurate.