Down the Rabbit Hole we go….my review of Unthinkable

marshall-murder-suicideI was shocked to wake up and discover the New York Times had reviewed the release of a extremely low-budget and obscure 9/11 conspiracy film called Unthinkable, closely based on the life and death of Philip Marshall, who was found dead along with his two teenage children, all three with a single bullet to the head.
Marshall had briefly worked in New Orleans with Barry Seal many decades ago, and Barry was one of the most famous spooks of his time, and a man hung out to dry by the CIA after he stopped playing ball and threatened to go rouge. Marshall wrote a book about Barry, then published a book on 9/11. He was continuing to investigate that incident when he abruptly turned up dead. Since Marshall was a pilot, it was easy for him to gather evidence that conflicted with the official story because some of the planes that day were doing maneuvers captured by radar that defied the abilities of the most accomplished pilots, much less anyone with only a few hours of training. Many months after Marshall’s death, I finally got around to ordering a copy of his 9/11 book, The Big Bamboozle, which never made a splash in the press or earned much money. The book had some useful information, but did not break new ground or contain any smoking guns. Obviously, we’ll never know what really happened on 9/11 until the obvious trails into Saudi Arabia and Pakistan are fully investigated, something Congress refused to do, but my initial suspicion was Marshall may have been whacked.

Wayne Madsen
Wayne Madsen

Wayne Madsen flew out to California to investigate this incident and decided it was murder, not suicide as claimed by the local police. Unthinkable is told from Maden’s point-of-view and seems to rely exclusively on his evidence.
So why is the New York Times even the slightest bit interested in this film anyway? Please note Madsen is a frequent guest on the Alex Jones, and Jones is an obvious demagogue spreading paranoia.
The good thing about all this is it basically confirms my suspicion Madsen is still a spook. Of course, he makes no secret of his past work for the NSA, or career in the Navy, the most sinister of all the divisions of the military it seems, or at least the one with the longest documented involvement with organized crime, since it was Naval intelligence that made the deal with Lucky Luciano and later tried to buy off Jim Garrison’s investigation of JFK’s assassination.
I don’t trust whistleblowers on sight because most are manufactured and controlled in some way. Real whistleblowers get whacked, while fakes end up on the cover of Time magazine. This is nothing new and things have been handled in this way for a long time, which is why I call it “a wilderness of mirrors.” But if you want to add another layer of complexity to this situation, paint legitimate suicides as NSA hits. The same thing was basically attempted after Gary Webb committed suicide. Gary had already lost his job, his house, his family. His last possession, his motorcycle, was stolen right before he killed himself. Daniel Hopsicker wrote a great blog on Marshall’s death and does not trust Madsen any more than I do.
So I’ve decided Philip Marshall was bipolar, about to divorce, and in a delusional breakdown when he shot his sleeping kids in the head and turned his gun on himself. The major objections to this were no one in the neighborhood heard any shots that night, but, in fact, the police did test the weapon inside the house and discovered it did not make sufficient noise to alarm anyone in the adjacent homes.
Consequently, you might take this film with a grain of salt, or anything else that stems from the research of Wayne Madsen.
Here’s the trailer:


Alex Jones and Salon: The dialectics of discrediting conspiracy theory

A big dance went down between Alex Jones and Salon over the Boston Marathon Bombing. Salon had already bestowed the title “King of Conspiracy Theory” on Jones earlier and began blogging about him daily, thus increasing his fame, even though Jones is an obvious crackpot demagogue and in no way a real, organic citizen researcher like myself.

Any sensible person rejected Jones after he doctored a pair of Family Guy clips to make it appear the Boston Bombing was predicted by the TV show, a blunder that will forever discredit him. See, Jones likes to push the theory all violence in America is being orchestrated by the Illuminati to mind control us. And when the Colorado shooting happened, that was supposedly a mind control project. Same with Sandy Hook. Never mind the lack of any evidence in this regard, Jones and his ilk just mine coincidences and rumors to bolster phony cases. See, a Batman movie once mentioned the words “Sandy Hook,” so that means they plan these events decades in advance and place evidence of their plots into the movies and TV so when the crimes happen, it subconsciously controls our mind. It’s hard to even figure out what point they are trying to make with these ridiculous theories, other than manufacturing paranoia.

Jones doctored two Family Guy episodes and then presented this as evidence of an Illuminati mind control experiment. This is just the sort of sophomoric drivel Mark Passio pushes, completely devoid of any real research, just the art of connecting dots that don’t connect and then scaring people with the Illuminati boogeyman.

So why would any sensible person even talk to Alex Jones after he pulled that stunt? Of course two of the biggest “whistleblowers” in America talk to Jones all the time: Wayne Madsen and Sibol Edmonds, both former members of the national security state whom I wanted to believe were reliable sources of info, but considering their strong connection to Jones (a manufactured lightning rod, just as Wikileaks and Snowden are manufactured lightning rods), I feel I can’t fully trust them.

I’d assume the National Security State is setting up a dialectic with Salon on one side and Jones on the other, as if those two paradigms are our only options. Of course, I always assumed Salon was a CIA op.