The Torture Report

Remember this guy? A year-and-a-half after 9/11, Pakistan ISI picked up Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and turned him over to the CIA, who renditioned him to Gitmo and proceeded to torture him for years, while also waterboarding him 183 times, “enhanced interrogation techniques” designed to break down his personality. Two weeks after Khalid was picked up, we invaded Iraq and destroyed the social fabric of that country, a campaign that resulted in nearly a half million casualties.

Gitmo torture would have been illegal on US soil, and “confessions” extracted under such duress have no more credibility than those extracted by Jesuit inquisitors during their crackdown on the Renaissance. So what is it about 9/11 that resulted in this two-decade delay in prosecuting the case, which is now scheduled to go before a military tribunal in 2021?

It’s amazing two psychologists with zero experience in interrogations or terrorism were paid $81 million dollars to administer torture to the Gitmo detainees, at least a quarter of whom were completely innocent and never should have been abducted and tortured in the first place. After the reality of what was going on leaked out to Congress, audio and video tapes of all torture sessions were swiftly destroyed by the CIA.

The Report is a film about the decade-long investigation conducted by Daniel Jones, a Senate staffer for Dianne Feinstein, vice chair of the Intelligence Committee. Jones was given access to millions of CIA documents and emails and spent seven years tracking every detainee through the system, discovering some painful truths along the way. Unfortunately, his report was suppressed and never made public.

But his conclusions are presented in this film, and they include that the CIA knew the torture sessions would not produce credible evidence, only fake confessions. Why would the CIA pay $81 million dollars to conduct worthless interrogations? Even more startling, the film exposes the lies of Zero Dark Thirty, a blatant propaganda film that attempted to justify Gitmo torture as essential to the capture and assassination of Osama Bin Laden, who was probably already long dead anyway.

But the film really stops short of examining the bigger questions, like who really planned 9/11, and who really was murdered in Pakistan?

So the reason the CIA snatched 775 people and tortured them for years was not to get to the real story of 9/11, but to create the false impression they had actually rounded up the perpetrators , while extracting confessions that could be touted in the media to justify the war on terror.

The film is certainly worth watching on Amazon, even though it does drag on while skirting around some obvious truths. Maybe if more Americans start putting two and two together, the scales may fall from their eyes. I know it’s difficult for many to confront the reality international terrorism is a tool of intelligence agencies and deployed to justify a fascist military state that inflicts the terror through secret operations.

The truth is the Gitmo torture sessions laid a foundation for a future wave of jihadist terrorism, because that’s exactly what’s going to happen. When you foment violence (especially upon innocent people), eventually that violence will come back at you in some form. In intelligence, it’s called “blowback,” and the CIA is well aware of the impact and implications.

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